sweat

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products

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tips

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Click HERE to learn how to best use SURE and eliminate sweat stains.

health

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sweat

Our body is always trying to maintain an even body temperature. Sweating is natural and normal. It helps our body to cool and get rid of excess heat from working muscles, detoxify dissolved solids, and send sodium (salt) back into the blood to maintain salinity in the body. Sweating reduces body heat through a process known as evaporative cooling.

Lots of things can make us sweat. Heat and humidity, physical activity, pregnancy, stress, emotions, hormones, sickness and fever, coffee, alcohol, spicy foods and certain medical conditions and medications can all induce sweating—more for some people, less for others.

Sweating is not a sign of weakness—it is a natural physiological process. The key to feeling dry, fresh and confident is to use SURE every day.

No. We have two types of sweat glands. Eccrine glands produce a watery sweat containing water and sodium and are found all over our bodies, especially on the hands, feet and face. They release the fluid through the sweat pores onto the surface of the skin, where it cools the body as it evaporates. Apocrine glands, on the other hand, are found in areas with lots of hair follicles such as the armpits and groin. They produce a smaller amount of a thicker fluid containing water, protein, fatty acids and other substances, and release the fluid through the hair follicle onto the skin surface, where it mixes with perspiration from the eccrine glands.

Sweat by itself is odorless. Only the bacteria found normally on our skin break it down is the odor created.

Our feet sweat because of heat and exercise, as well as stress. With other areas of the body, sweat can easily evaporate, but with feet it gets trapped between our toes and in socks and shoes. When sweat gets trapped, the bacteria that feed on our sweat release an unpleasant smell, causing foot odor or smelly feet, also known as bromodosis.

Some people’s feet naturally sweat more than others, but it doesn’t cause them any problems or discomfort. Changes during puberty, pregnancy and the menopause can also increase foot sweating. And people who stand all day for their job can find their feet sweat more.

  • Sweat easily gets trapped on our feet and toes, so wash and dry them properly at least once a day.
  • Socks made from natural fabrics like cotton or bamboo fibers are the best option, as they draw moisture away from the feet.
  • Change your socks at least once a day.
  • Wear shoes made from breathable materials, like canvas or leather. Sandals or flip-flops in the summer will help your feet breathe.
  • Don’t wear the same pair of shoes every day, so they have time to dry out.
  • For very sweaty feet, wipe rubbing alcohol between your toes after a shower or bath to help dry them out.
  • Deodorizing insoles and foot powders can help to absorb sweat and keep shoes fresh.
  • Consider using a foot soap or deodorant – particularly in hot climates.
It’s perfectly normal. When you eat a meal your metabolism increases and that raises your body temperature. You then sweat in order to cool down.
Excessive sweating, especially when you’re not nervous, stressed or exercising might indicate a condition called hyperhidrosis. If you sweat all the time or are constantly soaking through your tee shirt, it’s best to see a physician. In general, dermatologists are the best trained to diagnose and treat hyperhidrosis. Your dermatologist may recommend a prescription-strength antiperspirant or other options. By the way, you’re not alone. It’s estimated that 3% of the U.S. population have this condition. For further information you might want to check out the International Hyperhidrosis Society’s Web site,
www.SweatHelp.org.


products

Antiperspirants help limit wetness and odor. They minimize wetness by reducing sweating or perspiration. Minimizing wetness also helps to minimize odor because odor comes as a result of the breakdown of perspiration by bacteria that live on your skin. Most antiperspirant products also contain deodorant, which helps fight odor.

Deodorants do not control wetness. They only help limit odor. Deodorants use an antibacterial agent to kill the bacteria that live on your skin. Odor is caused by the breakdown of perspiration by those bacteria. Deodorants contain fragrance to keep you smelling fresh.

The good news is all SURE products contain both antiperspirant and deodorant—to help keep you confidant day and night.

Yes, SURE products are safe for all skin types. However, if your skin is particularly sensitive you may want to use our Unscented Invisible Solid. Or use our Conditioning Solid formulas to nourish and soothe your skin while keeping you dry, confident and smelling clean.
Advanced Odor Protection Technology works with encapsulated fragrance beads within the formula to create a fresh release of fragrance throughout the day when you need it most. The result: Superior fragrance delivery, more impact, and longer lasting freshness.
Very little. Although the product is labeled unscented it does contain a low level of a fragrance that masks the natural scent of the base formula while providing deodorant protection.
You SURE can. Go to the product you’re interested in and click on a link to purchase from your favorite online retailer.


tips

SURE should be applied daily onto clean, dry skin. Apply the solid to your underarms with a few strokes, or the aerosol with a quick spray, and you’re ready to go. SURE’s trusted protection lasts all day. If you’re prone to heavy sweating you may want to reapply as needed.

Our NEW Powder Fresh Invisible Solid and Original Solid, and NEW Fresh & Cool Invisible Solid and Original Solid, provide 48-hour protection plus advanced odor protection to release fresh fragrance throughout the day when you need it most.

Make it a daily habit to apply SURE to clean, dry skin.

Try massaging SURE onto dry underarm skin before you go to bed. People sweat less at night, when they are resting, and it won’t get washed away before it’s absorbed into your glands. Leave SURE on your skin for at least eight hours for maximum absorption.

Wear breathable clothing. Natural fabrics such as cotton, wool, hemp, silk or linen allow air to pass through to your skin, and the cloth fibers absorb moisture well, which prevents bacteria from feeding on your sweat and causing odor. Other fabrics such as bamboo, lyocell and modal are made from plant cellulose and pulp, and function similarly to natural fabrics.

In the summer, try synthetic moisture-wicking fabrics—they draw moisture away from the skin and to the outside of the clothing, where it evaporates more quickly.

In the winter, use a smart layering technique with outer layers that are easy to remove when you head inside. Using removable layers is also a good idea in the fall and spring, when the temperatures can go up and down daily and be quite unpredictable.

TO PREVENT: Residue is often a result of applying too much of the product. To prevent residue, apply a thin, even layer of the product to dry, clean skin and allow the product to dry before dressing.

TO REMOVE: Try soap without added moisturizers. Cleansing bars or body washes with levels of moisturizer won’t clean the residue as well.

White, grey or black stains usually indicate the overuse of antiperspirant or deodorant. If too much product is applied, it will not absorb into the skin and the product will transfer onto clothing. These stains may be greasy, oily or chalky in appearance.

TO PREVENT:
Start with clean skin and blot your underarms to remove any excess wetness before applying the product. Then apply a thin, even layer and allow it to dry before dressing.

TO REMOVE:
FOR DRY CLEAN ONLY FABRIC: Inform your dry cleaner of the stain so they can pre-treat. Most stains can be removed by dry cleaning.
FOR MACHINE-WASHABLE FABRIC: Work only in a well-ventilated area and avoid inhaling solvent fumes for maximum protection of your lungs. Wear rubber gloves when working with cleaning products.

  • Turn the garment inside out and apply a cleaning solvent or stain remover to the affected area and scrub. Apply a liquid detergent on top of the solvent and scrub.
  • Rinse under warm running water.
  • Alternatively apply solvent or stain remover and liquid detergent, scrubbing and rinsing until the stain is gone.
  • Wash in the hottest water that is safe for the fabric (max. temp 160 degrees F)

Prevent recurrence by pre-treating clothing by scrubbing underarm areas with liquid detergent and stain remover between washings.

Yellow stains are usually caused by too much perspiration and not enough antiperspirant.

TO PREVENT:
Try blotting your underarms to remove any excess wetness before applying the antiperspirant. Then apply a thin, even layer of antiperspirant and allow it to dry before getting dressed.

TO CLEAN:
IF WHITE CLOTHING: Treat stained area with ammonia (for fresh stains) or vinegar (for old stains).
IF COLORED CLOTHING: We suggest the following steps:

  • With colored fabrics, apply a small amount of vinegar or ammonia to an inside hem to make SURE the dye won’t be removed by the treatment.
  • Allow it to sit for 20 minutes, then rinse.
  • Apply a small amount of a detergent to the area and scrub.
  • If the stain is particularly heavy, repeat the process 1 or 2 more times.
  • Wash the garment in the hottest water safe for the fabric and use chlorine bleach if it’s safe for the fabric.
  • Rinse under warm running water.
  • Repeat this process until soiled mark is gone.


health

Sweating more during early pregnancy is very common. You might experience hot flashes during the day as well as night sweats.

During pregnancy hormone levels and blood flow increase, causing the body temperature to rise, so the body sweats more to cool you down. Some women also experience sweating after pregnancy as the body releases excess fluid and hormone levels rebalance.

Night sweats can be an early sign of pregnancy, though they can also be caused by other factors. The part of the brain that regulates your heat levels is impacted by the change in hormones, causing you to sweat more. Night sweats and excessive sweating in pregnancy tend to reduce over the nine months, but may increase near your delivery date due to further hormonal changes.
Here are some tips for making your pregnancy sweat easier to manage:

  • Wash or shower regularly.
  • Use SURE daily. If you’re sweating excessively during your pregnancy, apply as needed. Antiperspirants are safe to use during pregnancy. If you find that your skin is more sensitive, you may want to consider our Conditioning Solid formulas.
  • Wear loose-fitting clothes and go for natural fibers that breathe. Underwear made of cotton will also be more breathable.
  • Stay hydrated and always carry a bottle of water with you to keep you cool.
  • If you’re getting night sweats, ensure your bedroom is cool enough by opening a window, or switch your bedclothes or quilt to a lighter fabric.

If your increased sweating is accompanied by a fever, rapid heartbeat or other symptoms, you should seek advice from a medical professional.

Menopause is the time in a woman’s life when she will naturally cease to have periods. Some women go through menopause with few symptoms and little discomfort. But others experience increases in body temperature, known as ‘hot flashes’ or ‘hot flushes’, cold sweats, night sweats and, in some cases, excessive sweating.
Around 70% of women experience hot flashes during their menopause. The ‘flash’ itself can last for 30 seconds to 30 minutes. This is due to changing estrogen levels, which impact the body’s ability to regulate temperature.

Menopause occurs between the ages of 45 and 55, and the symptoms can vary in intensity from mild to (in some cases) extreme and vary in duration from a few months to several years. For some women, menopause sweat can have a significant impact on everyday life. But there are things you can do to sweat less and feel more comfortable.

  • Wash or shower regularly.
  • Use SURE daily.
  • Wear loose-fitting clothes and go for natural fibers that breathe, like cotton underwear.
  • Avoid alcohol, caffeine, spicy food and smoking. These can trigger a hot flash.
  • Stay fit. Exercise has been shown to reduce the impact of hot flashes.
  • Keep a healthy weight. Excess weight is likely to cause more hot flashes.
  • Stay hydrated and carry a bottle of water with you.
  • If you’re getting night sweats, ensure your bedroom is cool enough by opening a window, or switch your bedclothes to a lighter fabric.

If you’re concerned about sweating during menopause, talk to your doctor about your symptoms and discuss medicines and alternative therapies that may be of help to you.

No, antiperspirants will not cause kidney disease.
The FDA considers antiperspirants completely safe and effective. Otherwise, they would not allow them to be marketed. Aluminum is removed from the body primarily by the kidneys. Thus, people with kidney disease may not remove aluminum as effectively. The FDA issued a ruling that requires all U.S. antiperspirants to carry a warning statement to make consumers aware that exposure to aluminum from antiperspirants might need to be discussed with their doctor. If you have kidney disease, we suggest that you consult with your doctor about the warning statement. To put it into perspective, aluminum is found in the food and water we consume and in the air we breathe. Daily aluminum intake from food and water is thought to be much greater than exposure from daily use of antiperspirants or other beauty care products.
The aluminum compounds in antiperspirants have been extensively evaluated and have been proven to be safe and effective. The cause of Alzheimer’s is unknown and there is no definitive evidence that points to aluminum from consumer products as a cause of Alzheimer’s disease. We hope you’ll continue to use SURE with confidence.
There is no scientific or medical evidence to suggest that the use of antiperspirants causes breast cancer. Neither the American Cancer Society nor the National Cancer Institute has recommendations against the use of antiperspirants. For more information, you can contact The American Cancer Society at http://www.cancer.org. The ACS issued a statement clearly refuting the rumor. Also, you can visit the Aluminum Association at http://www.aluminum.org and the American Society of Nephrology at http://www.asn-online.org for more information.